Juan Felipe Herrera

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Is Juan Felipe Herrera Dead or Still Alive? Juan Felipe Herrera Birthday and Age

Juan Felipe Herrera

How Old Is Juan Felipe Herrera? Juan Felipe Herrera Birthday

Juan Felipe Herrera was born on December 27, 1948 and is 73 years old now.

Birthday: December 27, 1948
How Old - Age: 73

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Juan Felipe Herrera - Biography

Professor Juan Felipe Herrera, a writer, poet, teacher, and activist has been named Poet Laureate of California. He is the first Hispanic to be named California Poet Laureate.Professor Juan Felipe Herrera was born in Fowler, California. He is the only son of migrant workers from Mexico; Felipe Emilio Herrera and Maria de la Luz Quintana. The three were “campesinos” who worked in the fields of the San Joaquin Valley and Salinas Valley. Juan Felipe lives with his partner Margarita Robles, a poet and performing artist. Juan Felipe is the father of the author and artist Joaquin Ramon Herrera.Professor Juan Felipe Herrera, a writer, poet, teacher, and activist has been named Poet Laureate of California. He is the first Hispanic to be named California Poet Laureate.Professor Juan Felipe Herrera was born in Fowler, California. He is the only son of migrant workers from Mexico; Felipe Emilio Herrera and Maria de la Luz Quintana. The three were “campesinos” who worked in the fields of the San Joaquin Valley and Salinas Valley. Juan Felipe lives with his partner Margarita Robles, a poet and performing artist. Juan Felipe is the father of the author and artist Joaquin Ramon Herrera.Herrera received his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Anthropology from the University of California, Los Angeles, his Masters in social Anthropology from Stanford University, and his Masters in Fine arts, in Creative Writing from the University of Iowa.In 1990, Juan Felipe Herrera, served as a distinguished teaching fellow at the University of Iowa Writer’s Workshop, he later taught at the California State University, Fresno. He also served as Chairman of the Chicano and Latin American Studies DepartmentIn 2005, he joined the creative Writing Department at University of California, Riverside as the Tomas Rivera Endowed Chair and Director of the Art and Barbara Culver Center for the Arts,Herrera began his work in poetry as well as his involvement with the Chicano civil rights movement at University of California Los Angeles (UCLA.), when the movement was at its height Juan Felipe Herrera stood alone, nervously reciting his poetry in the middle of the designated free speech area in Kerckhoff Plaza. Herrera had found a stage to express himself that launched a long career in poetry.“You can imagine the electricity in the air within the faculty, the students, the times,” he said. “The civil rights movement (was) coursing through our blood. ... I was in the middle of that creative and political social tsunami. “(My poetry is) about stories that I felt had not been told or that were distorted from my point of view,” he said. These included the view of farm workers or the Latino community. “Poetry has the power to move people,” The Chicano movement was largely fueled by the arts and especially by poetry, and Herrera emerged during that period,” stated Chon Noriega, director of the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, who is familiar with Herrera’s work. Herrera aims to bring higher accessibility to different communities with his new project that he is launching “Project Primavera California,” which means “Project Spring California.” The project will call on poets, librarians, and artists of all genres to come together and celebrate poetry through their own mediums.Herrera created a project called “Libros y Familias,” or “Books and Families.” The project would bring local children’s book authors to a school to present their books bilingually to the students, and the same book in the evening, to the parents.“This would give access to books to non-English speaking students, as well as connect children and their parents with literature,” Herrera stated. “I think the poet laureate position ideally ... helps people connect with poetry and what it can do,” Herrera further stated. Through his projects, Herrera said he hopes he can continue to cross cultural, social, and artistic boundaries.Herrera is the author of 28 books and currently serves as chairman of the creative writing department at the University of California at Riverside.

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